DEFINITION OF TERMS

The following definitions of terms are for use in the E-Plan Userfs Manual.

UN/DOT Number.
United Nations/ Department of Transportation (UN/DOT) numbers are four-digit numbers that identify hazardous substances, and articles (such as explosives, flammable liquids, toxic substances, etc.) in the framework of international transport. Associated with each UN number is a hazard identifier, which encodes the general hazard class and subdivision (and, in the case of explosives, their compatibility group).

Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG).
The Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) was developed jointly by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Transport Canada, and the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation of Mexico (SCT) for use by firefighters, police, and other emergency services personnel who may be the first to arrive at the scene of a transportation incident involving a hazardous material. It is primarily a guide to aid first responders in (1) quickly identifying the specific or generic classification of the material(s) involved in the incident, and (2) protecting themselves and the general public during this initial response phase of the incident. The ERG is updated every three to four years to accommodate new products and technology. The current version in use is 2012 (web site: http://phmsa.dot.gov/staticfiles/PHMSA/DownloadableFiles/Files/erg2008_eng.pdf).

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Number.
The CAS number, in the format xxx-xx-x, is unique for each chemical and allows efficient searching on computerized data bases. Chemical Abstracts Service, a division of the American Chemical Society, assigns these identifiers to every chemical that has been described in the literature. The intention is to make database searches more convenient, as chemicals often have many names. Almost all molecule databases today allow searching by CAS number.

Safety Data Sheet (SDS)
The Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires chemical manufacturers, distributors, or importers to provide Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) (formerly known as Material Safety Data Sheets or MSDSs) to communicate the hazards of hazardous chemical products. The SDSs must include the section numbers, the headings, and associated information under the headings below:

  • Section 1, Identification includes product identifier; manufacturer or distributor name, address, phone number; emergency phone number; recommended use; restrictions on use.
  • Section 2, Hazard(s) identification includes all hazards regarding the chemical; required label elements.
  • Section 3, Composition/information on ingredients includes information on chemical ingredients; trade secret claims.
  • Section 4, First-aid measures includes important symptoms/ effects, acute, delayed; required treatment.
  • Section 5, Fire-fighting measures lists suitable extinguishing techniques, equipment; chemical hazards from fire.
  • Section 6, Accidental release measures lists emergency procedures; protective equipment; proper methods of containment and cleanup.
  • Section 7, Handling and storage lists precautions for safe handling and storage, including incompatibilities.
  • Section 8, Exposure controls/personal protection lists OSHAfs Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs); ACGIH Threshold Limit Values (TLVs); and any other exposure limit used or recommended by the chemical manufacturer, importer, or employer preparing the SDS where available as well as appropriate engineering controls; personal protective equipment (PPE).
  • Section 9, Physical and chemical properties lists the chemical's characteristics.
  • Section 10, Stability and reactivity lists chemical stability and possibility of hazardous reactions.
  • Section 11, Toxicological information includes routes of exposure; related symptoms, acute and chronic effects; numerical measures of toxicity.
  • Section 12, Ecological information*
  • Section 13, Disposal considerations*
  • Section 14, Transport information*
  • Section 15, Regulatory information*
  • Section 16, Other information, includes the date of preparation or last revision.
*Note: Since other Agencies regulate this information, OSHA will not be enforcing Sections 12 through 15(29 CFR 1910.1200(g)(2)).

Dun and Bradstreet (D&B).
The D&B DUNS Number (website: http://www.dnb.com/us/) is an unique nine-digit identification sequence, which provides a unique identifier of single business entities, while linking corporate family structures together.

NFPA Code.
The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) system uses a diamond-shaped diagram of symbols and numbers to indicate the degree of hazard associated with a particular chemical or material. These diamond shaped symbols are placed on containers of chemicals or materials to identify the degree of hazard associated with the chemical or material. The diagram identifies three color-coded categories of hazard for each material. Each category is divided in levels of hazard potential with increasing numbers indicating increasing hazards. The abbreviated degrees of hazard in each of these categories are given as follows:

Health - Blue

4

Danger

May be fatal on short exposure. Specialized protective equipment required.

3

Warning

Corrosive or toxic. Avoid skin contact or inhalation.

2

Warning

May be harmful if inhaled or absorbed.

1

Caution

May be irritating.

0

No unusual hazard.

 

Flammability - Red

4

Danger

Flammable gas or extremely flammable liquid.

3

Warning

Flammable liquid flash point below 38 C.

2

Caution

Combustible liquid flash point between 38 and 93 C.

1

Combustible if heated.

0

Not combustible.

 

Reactivity - Yellow

4

Danger

Explosive material at room temperature.

3

Danger

May be explosive if shocked, heated under confinement or mixed with water.

2

Warning

Unstable or may react violently if mixed with water.

1

Caution

May react if heated or mixed with water but not violently

0

Stable

Not reactive when mixed with water.

 

Special Notice - White

W

Water Reactive.

OXY

Oxidizing Agent.

U.S. Coast Guard CHRIS Data.
The Chemical Hazards Response Information System (CHRIS) is designed to provide information needed for decision-making by responsible U.S. Coast Guard personnel during emergencies that occur during the water transport of hazardous chemicals. CHRIS also provides much information that can be used by the Coast Guard in its efforts to achieve better safety procedures and to prevent accidents.

Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code.
The Standard Industrial Classification has been replaced by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code.
On January 1, 2003 OSHA began using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) for industry identification in its various data sets. NAICS uses a six digit hierarchical coding system to classify all economic activity into twenty industry sectors. Five sectors are mainly goods-producing sectors and fifteen are entirely services-producing sectors. This six digit hierarchical structure allows greater coding flexibility than the four digit structure of the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS allows for the identification of 1,170 industries compared to the 1,004 found in the SIC. For detailed information on the NAICS coding structure or search the NAICS by keyword, please visit the U.S. Census Bureau at http://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/.

Risk Management Plan (RMP).
Under the authority of section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, the Chemical Accident Prevention Provisions require facilities that produce, handle, process, distribute, or store certain chemicals to develop a Risk Management Program, prepare a Risk Management Plan (RMP), and submit the RMP to EPA. Covered facilities were initially required to comply with the rule in 1999, and the rule has been amended on several occasions since then, most recently in 2004.

EPA has developed a software for RMP submission called RMP*Submit. This report contains all the information needed to complete a summary plan, organized into nine sections: registration, toxics worst-case release scenario(s), toxics alternative release scenario(s), flammables worst-case release scenario(s), flammables alternative release scenario(s), accident history, prevention program - Level 2, prevention program - Level 3, and emergency response.

EPAfs RMP web site: http://www.epa.gov/oem/content/rmp/index.htm

Tier II Chemical Report Inventory / Tier II Submit.
Facilities covered by Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) requirements must submit an Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Form to the Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC), the State Emergency Response Commission (SERC), and the local fire department annually. Facilities provide either a Tier I or Tier II form. Most States require the Tier II form. Some states have specific requirements in addition to the federal Tier II requirements. Many accept Tier2 Submit.

A Tier II form provides the following information for each substance:

  • The chemical name or the common name as indicated on the MSDS;
  • An estimate (in ranges) of the maximum amount of the chemical present at any time during the preceding calendar year and the average daily amount;
  • A brief description of the hazards and manner of storage of the chemical;
  • The location of the chemical at the facility; and
  • An indication of whether the owner elects to withhold location information from disclosure to the public.

EPAfs Tier2 Submit website: http://www.epa.gov/oem/content/epcra/tier2.htm

Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations (CAMEO).
CAMEO is a system of software applications used widely to plan for and respond to chemical emergencies. It is one of the tools developed by EPAfs Office of Emergency Management (OEM) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office of Response and Restoration (NOAA), to assist front-line chemical emergency planners and responders. They can use CAMEO to access, store, and evaluate information critical for developing emergency plans. In addition, CAMEO supports regulatory compliance by helping users meet the chemical inventory reporting requirements of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA, also known as SARA Title III). CAMEO also can be used with a separate software application called LandView R to display EPA environmental databases and demographic/economic information to support analysis of environmental justice issues.

EPAfs CAMEO website: http://www.epa.gov/emergencies/content/cameo/index.htm